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Lemonade Day in Wayne County is changing with the times in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic

There will be no lemonade stands on the streets of Wayne County this year, but, in their place, organizers are challenging area youth to a new viral Lemonade Day, one built around an on line game and curriculum that will again offer tips on business planning, product development, marketing and promotion and sales.

Boy learning about becoming an entrepreneur on laptop

Welcome to Lemonade Day My Way.

 

There will be no lemonade stands on the streets of Wayne County this year, but, in their place, organizers are challenging area youth to a new viral Lemonade Day, one built around an on line game and curriculum that will again offer tips on business planning, product development, marketing and promotion and sales.

 

It will also offer participants an opportunity to adapt, change and learn as they grow their business and sell their products in a new virtual world.

 

“Out of necessity comes innovation,” said Fonda Wilds, beginning her 13th year as Richmond Lemonade Day coordinator. “And out of chaos comes creativity. That’s what entrepreneurs do. They adapt. They change. They transform.

 

“That’s what we’re asking young people to do today with this program,” she said.

 

Lemonade Day My Way asks participants to go to the Lemonade Day website, enroll and play an interactive game called Lemonopolis.

 

They then go through the curriculum, learning skills like business planning, product development, financial management, marketing and promotion, customer service and charitable giving.

 

Next they can create their own on line business and plunge into the process of business management and success, just like an entrepreneur would do in this day and age of pandemic.

 

“This is our transition,” Wilds said. “We’re all in this together and, in this together, we all have to rethink the way we live. There will be no lemonade stands this year, but that doesn’t mean we can’t engage young minds, engaging the tools on line, and then let them dream.”

 

Participants start by going to the website lemonadeday.org/lemonade-day-my-way and sign up by finding the Wayne County page. After playing Lemonopolis they go through the curriculum which will help them build their business and put it to work.

 

In the end, they report their results to Lemonade Day organizers, who share them with sponsors.


“Sponsors are critical to what we do and what we accomplish,” Wilds said. “What we accomplish is unlocking kid power, their passion, their creativity. We could not do this without our sponsors.”

 

National Lemonade Day president Steven Gordon said the 2020 program offers young people a creative, fun and safe way to start a business and earn money.

 

“Quarantines, social distancing, remote working and home-schooling have been especially difficult for kids and teens,” Gordon said. “These realities have forced young people to stay at home, not interact as much with their friends nor enjoy regular summer activities.

 

“That’s why we want the Lemonade Day My Way experience to be there for them to demonstrate that challenges can produce opportunities for innovation, change and growth,” he said.  

 

Wilds said young people can get started at any time.

 

“All we ask is that they be creative,” she said. “That’s the beauty of engaging young minds.”

 

Health officials in Wayne County recognize the challenges that the pandemic presents to the community and events like Lemonade Day, and they applaud the effort to hold a virtual event.

 

“We are excited to see how our young citizens take this challenge of a virtual Lemonade Day stand,” said Christine Stinson, executive director of the Wayne County Health Department. “By holding a virtual event, we still get to experience the thrill of starting a business, but help to keep our community safe. We thank you.”

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